Agriculturalist Anika Molesworth – joining a 1000 women in STEMM to invest in tomorrows leaders today

Agriculture needs its leaders. But leaders don’t just happen. To be effective a leader must have a vision that extends beyond their own backyard, have the skills to communicate that vision, a network of collaborative cohorts, the courage to engage in difficult conversations and the perseverance to see the vision transformed into action. So how do we support tomorrow’s leaders today?

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Young Farming Champion Anika Molesworth is well regarded for her passion to see agriculture flourish in a changing climate. She has attended COP21 in Paris, conducted seminars at Broken Hill, presented at numerous conferences, spoken at TedX and is currently studying a PhD comparing Australian agriculture with that in South East Asia.

I am absolutely fascinated, intrigued and inspired by the natural world. Its systems are so incredibly complex and with such extraordinary interplay. But I also realise how extremely fragile it is. How precarious it is to mismanagement. People living and working in rural and regional Australia, particularly people in agriculture, play such an overwhelmingly important role in the management and protection of these systems, and in many instances give these landscapes and ecosystems a voice. They share the story of the land, of how it can be harnessed to feed and clothe people and nurtured to sustain vibrant biodiversity. I am driven to amplify that voice.

Anika is ready for the next leadership step: Homeward Bound.

Homeward Bound is a ground-breaking leadership initiative, set against the backdrop of Antarctica, which aims to heighten the influence and impact of women in making decisions that shape our planet.

The course will cover leadership training, environmental and research policy, career strategy, visibility, networking, fund raising, and presentation and communication skills, and will culminate in a journey to Antarctica over the 2019/2020 summer.


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Picture – Oli Sansom.

“Programs like Homeward Bound and the Young Farming Champions help to upskill and empower individuals,” Anika says. “Yet in doing so, the outcomes and impacts from these programs are so much further reaching. What they do is help individuals seeking greater clarity in their own personal skillsets, purpose and values, become clearer on their sense of self, what they believe and what’s important to them. It helps them focus their two most precious resources, time and energy, more effectively.”

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Christina Kirsch of ClearSky Solar with Anika Molesworth at the 2018 Green Globe Awards

Christina Kirsch of ClearSky Solar met with Anika at the 2018 Green Globe Awards. Christina participated in the initial Homeward Bound course in 2016 and still feels the reverberations.

” The goals are to create connectedness and networking among women where the collective is more important than the individual,” she says. “It is about women taking responsibility and ownership of ideals and to collaboratively develop programs going forward.”

Anika holds similar views:

“When you enable teams of highly energized, values-focused people, the enthusiasm and energy released can be formidable.”

One of the challenges Anika will face as a participant in Homeward Bound is to raise the funds required to travel to Antarctica. This on its own can be a daunting task. Although Homeward Bound will provide training and assistance on how to go about this, ultimately it is up to the individual to align with investors who want to be part of that shared collective.

Anika believes she has genuine reasons for asking people to invest.

“I have been through the YFC program and collected a treasure-trove of public speaking skills, industry knowledge, article writing experience and media training, and connected with the most inspiring group of young Australians and mentors. The Homeward Bound program builds on this and amplifies this with its global alumni network, teachers and mentors. It expands my networks to women across the globe working in STEMM.”

These are skills Anika will develop, to the benefit of all Australian agriculture.

As details are finalised we will share Anika’s fundraising initiatives including her Crowdfunding page . In the meantime if you would like a spectacular guest speaker for your event or would like to discuss other opportunities for collaboration please email Anika at anika.molesworth@gmail.com

This is what others are saying about Anika as a keynote speaker


“Anika shared her passion for a sustainable agriculture at the Ag to 2030 Brave New World Conference in 2018. She challenged thought leaders in mainstream Australian agriculture and gained their respect as a credible voice in how a changing climate is impacting Australian primary production systems.”
Ag Institute Australia

“It was a pleasure to engage Anika Molesworth as a presenter during the National Farmers’ Federation Towards 2030 Leadership Program in Canberra in 2018. Anika is a most engaging speaker; honest and reflective, open to feedback, happy to share her challenges and successes and very generous with her learning and advice.”
Australian Rural Leadership Foundation

“[We were] transfixed by Anika Molesworth and her passionate presentation. This wasn’t like any conference presentation, this was truly passionate and heatfelt. It was a privilege to listen. Walking away inspired.”
​Kelpie Ap

Visit her website to learn more here

If you would like to make a personal donation you will find Anika’s Crowdfunding page here 

Will you invest in tomorrow’s agricultural leader today?

#YouthinAg

#YouthVoices19

#mothernatureneedsherdaughters

#HumanSynergistics

#Antarctica

#womeninSTEM

#womeninscience

#leadership

#womeninleadership

#HomewardBound

 

 

 

Wool Young Farming Champion Samantha Wan going beyond the awards

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Mega-congratulations go to Sam Wan, Wool Young Farming Champion  and Elders’ Wool Technical Coordinator at the National  Selling Centre in Melbourne, who was announced as the Elders Employee of the Year in 2018.

The ‘Thomas Elder’ Employee of the Year recognises and rewards an individual who is consistently a high performer, who demonstrates a commitment to safety, and who lives the One Elders values – integrity, accountability, team work, customer focus and innovation.

Sam was nominated by her managers for her work initiating the accessibility of auction footage as it takes place online, improving Elders’ end to end service to growers, training of next generation wool staff and representing Elders and agriculture at industry events and through programs such as Art4Agriculture.

As part of the award Sam now has $10,000 to put towards a study tour, and yes, she will be reinvesting in wool. Firstly she will attend EvokeAg in Melbourne in February and then she will be winging across the waters to Italy.

“I have chosen to go to Italy to further enrich my understanding of the wool supply chain in Europe,” Sam says. “I will visit mills dating back to the 16th century and have direct contact with iconic historical brands. I will see fabric being spun and weaved and get a feel for their passion when working with Australian merino wool; and I’ll be able to communicate that back in Australia to growers …. and to anyone else who will listen!”

Supported by Australian Wool Innovation, Sam often credits the Young Farming Champions Program as being of great benefit in her career and as part of paying it forward has joined the Picture You in Agriculture Sponsor Seeking Sub Committee.

“I would like to ensure that no school or student, who is genuinely interested in agriculture, is turned away,” she says, “and that future Young Farming Champions are fully resourced to develop the skills needed for tell their story and establish themselves in their chosen industry.”

Congratulations Sam and we look forward to hearing of your Italian adventures.

#YouthinAg #YouthVoices19 #WearWool #LoveWool

 

Young Farming Champions Muster January 2019 Edition 1

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Happy New Year from team YFC!

Another year, another 365 days of opportunity for this amazing bunch. While everyone has been enjoying their summer breaks the team keeps on achieving. Here are snippets from the last 2 weeks.

In the field

Over the last few weeks we have seen a huge number of dust storms blow through parts of Australia. While dust storm are not uncommon, the drought that continues to linger is making them more prevalent and more spectacular. A number of YFC have been caught in the middle of the dusty events with some great pictures captured here from right across New South Wales

This great video footage from Cotton YFC Ben Egan at Warren

and this from Wool YFC Bessie Thomas as Wilcannia

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and this from  grains YFC Keiley O’Brien at Narromine

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Out of the Field

The New Year is a time of change for many, with several of our YFC stepping into new positions around the country!

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Wool YFC Katherine Bain has got a promotion at Paraway Pastoral becoming a Business Analyst for Central West NSW Region. This role will see Katherine working closely with station managers analysing farm financial and production information. Congrats Katherine.

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It’s a long way from Ivanhoe, NSW to Launceston, TAS. Wool YFC Emma Turner made the move just before Christmas to join the Australian Wool Network as a Wool Admin and Buyer.

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In contrast, Eggs YFC Jasmine Whitten is heading out west to Cobar, NSW to take up a position as a Local Landcare Coordinator in January.

Jasmine also jumped on Picture You in Agriculture socials this week capturing her experiences at the Santa Gertrudis Junior Show in Warwick, QLD. It was her third year as a group leader at the show. The event aims to provide an opportunity for students aged 7-18 years to learn about all things beef from meat science, how to parade an animal, to be a junior judge!

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Wool YFC Lucy Collingridge has also been supporting the next generation. Lucy helped her home show society host 36 kids aged from 5-25 years for the Cootamundra Hereford Heifer Show.

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The two day show allowed kids to learn about breeding, growing and showing cattle, with detailed workshops on public speaking, halter making, assessing animals, artificial insemination, animal husbandry, grooming, parading and marketing.

Lucy said, ‘We had kids travel from all over NSW and even as far as SA! Due to the hot weather, a number of local studs provided cattle for the kids to use to reduce the risk of heat stress to transporting the livestock.’  

Summer heat is quite a contrast from Lucy’s worldly adventures in Canada. Lucy’s written a guest blog capturing her experiences here  

Huge accolades for YFC Tegan Nock pictured here celebrating with partner Frank Oly. Their collaboration Grassroots: A Documentary, recently won ‘Best Climate Change Documentary’ at the Life Science Film Festival in Prague.

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Grassroots was written & produced by Tegan and directed by Frank.  You can watch the doco (for free) over on the Australian Science Channel. Grab yourself a cuppa & settle in when you’ve got 20 min up your sleeves to be inspired by what a passionate group of people is able to achieve.

Watch it here

Congrats are also due to YFC Prue McCormack has had a busy few months ticking off 3 major milestones. Prue finished her Vet Science degree at CSU while 37 weeks pregnant! Prue & Shannon welcomed son Jock into the world on August 1st. Coincidentally Jock shares his birthday with horses, which is fitting given both his parents love of horses! Prue has recently commenced part time work at New England Veterinary Services while still operating her equine dentistry business

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Prue & Jock at Jock’s Christening

Last year Wool YFC Danila Marini won the Professional’s category at the LambEx Young Guns Competition. At LambEx Danila shared some of her work as a post-doc at the University of New England. She’s part of a larger team of researchers exploring how virtual fencing may help better manage livestock. Danila’s research focuses on sheep. If you missed LambEx, you now have the opportunity to watch her presentation online here. This is one you don’t want to miss

Danila impressed LambEx audiences with her presentation

Keeping with the YouTube theme, Lucy Collingridge  recently spoke to the University of New England about her time experiences at UNE. Congrats Danila and Lucy, great to see your communications skills being put to good use.

#YouthVoices19 #YouthinAG

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Young Public School takes home a swag of awards at Kreative Koalas

Regional newspaper The Young Witness has featured Young Public School and their swag of awards at the Kreative Koalas- Design a Bright Future Challenge Awards Day.

We have reprinted the story below

Young Public School, aided by a range of partnerships, took out a raft of awards at the 2018 Kreative Koalas- Design a Bright Future ceremony held in Goulburn on November 27, 2018.

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National program director Lynne Strong congratulated Young Public School for forging partnerships with farmers and environmentalists, with sponsors and corporate businesses and with not-for-profit organisations and communities.

“Research has time and time again shown that kids who go to schools that have strong relationships with business and the community have a much greater opportunity to thrive. 

Businesses and communities who engage with schools can enrich and enhance the delivery of education and students can see their learnings have real-world significance. When schools, parents, business and communities partner together great things can happen in the lives of children and young adults.”  she said. 

Kreative Koalas, a program designed to create awareness of Australia’s commitment to the United Nations Sustainability Development Goals (SDG), asks schools to design a community project and call to action, and to display their interpretive artwork on a giant fibreglass koala.  Class 2/3 studied SDG 12: Responsible Production and Consumption, while Class 4D studied SDG 14: Life Below the Water.

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Class 2/3 created Koko Kompost Koala, which won the Australian Wind Services Award for Best Kreative Koala Artwork, and instigated a partnership with Cleanway to reduce and recycle waste at the school. As part of their studies they were also visited by Wool Young Farming Champion and Sustainability Ambassador Adele Smith. Adele spoke to the students about how farmers have an important role to play in responsible production and wool as a sustainable fibre.

Class 4D created Chewy the Choking Koala to illustrate the impact of irresponsible  consumption and the damaging effects on life below the water. Under guidance from Finn Martin from Local Land Services students went on an excursion to a local creek. “We have been shocked and saddened by the amount of rubbish going into our waterways and eventually into the ocean,” the school said. The students also participated in the Take 3 movement, which encourages everyone to remove three pieces of rubbish from the environment every time they are out. 4D’s dedicated participation was rewarded when they were named the Holcim Reserve Grand Champion Kreative Koala.

#SDG #ZeroWaste

A NEW WAY TO EMPOWER  RURAL AND REGIONAL WOMEN

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Chair of our Youth Voices Leadership Team Jo Newton recently penned a piece for Stock and Land on why agriculture doesn’t need another leadership program. And why not? Because we already have a tried, tested and proven one in the Young Farming Champions program that offers participants leadership pathways beyond the traditional intensive workshop model.

Jo has received plenty of positive feedback from the article and it has prompted us to reflect on the mentorships and partnerships that support our Young Farming Champions as they transition to leadership roles. Jo personally values being mentored by David Mailler

‘David is someone I look up to. He challenges my thinking, encouraging me to look at a problem from new angles’. says Jo 

Dione Howard, who works as a district veterinarian, has recently formed a professional alliance with chair of Hunter Local Land Services Lindy Hyam.

As some-one starting my career journey its very valuable to have a mentor who has had successful careers in multiple sectors beyond agriculture. Lindy can help guide me through both my career and leadership journey challenges, help me make difficult decisions and offer advice when I am not sure which direction to take.” says Dione.  Watch Lindy talk about her career journey here

It was also our own Lynne Strong who introduced Anika Molesworth to Farmers for Climate Action, where she now sits on the board of directors.

“The best way to harness the energy of our emerging leaders is to connect them to one-another and greatly improve our collective capacity to shape a bright agricultural future. Farmers for Climate Action, like the Young Farming Champions program, is a network of individuals from all walks of life, from all different regions and farming industries – who all share a common vision. We are taking the journey together – and the shared values, support and respect we have for one another is the reason we are successful.” says Anika 

In 2019 PYiA, in conjunction with Young Farming Champions, will launch an extension to their leadership development with the introduction of a unique inter-generational mentorship model to empower rural and regional young women. The program,  Cultivate- Empowering  Influencers will support experienced leaders, coaches and champions to support young rural leaders to support emerging leaders and aspiring leaders to transform agriculturists into advocates and changemakers by:

  1. Creating confident, independent thinkers and skilled communicators,
  2. Building capacity to be adaptable and resilient in complex and challenging times,
  3. Developing enthusiastic, knowledgeable and capable young people taking an active role in the decision-making processes.

The model recognises successful people surround themselves with a framework of empowerment including the five principles of connect, coach, inspire, champion and mentor.

Young people need to identify others who can assist them with these principles. The initiative will see experienced leaders, mentor intermediate leaders such as Jo, who will in turn work with new Young Farming Champions and potentially with students who show potential though The Archibull Prize.

Training of both mentors and mentees is critical to success and the program will begin with an intensive two-day program bringing together mentors and mentees.

“This is a Pay-it-forward model of mentoring. Experience is leveraged in a hand up model, across three generations of leaders. Seasoned leaders mentor leadership program graduates into the hands-on aspects of business leadership, while YFC program graduates work with new participants, smoothing the way to more visible roles. This way experience is shared and expanded upon.” says Zoe Routh from Inner Compass Leadership Development.

For more information on how your organisation can partner with us please contact Lynne Strong Partnerships Manager E: lynnestrong@art4agriculture.com.au

#YouthVoices19 #YouthinAg

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Young Farming Champion Lucy Collingridge shares her 28th Commonwealth Agriculture Conference experience

Picture this. It is snowing, the temperature is -12*C and it is October. You are wearing business clothes and heading to a conference, using a yellow school bus to get from your hotel to the conference venue. Over 70 young people, all under the age of 40, have congregated to discuss the future of agriculture, agriculture events and the challenges facing agricultural communities across the world. Where are you? You are at the 2018 Royal Agricultural Societies of the Commonwealth (RASC) conference in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada!

On the 27th October 2018 I flew out of Sydney on a 15 hour flight destined for Canada. As a recipient of a scholarship from the Agricultural Societies Council of New South Wales, I was heading to the 28th Commonwealth Agriculture Conference as an Australian delegate. But, first things first, I spent a few days traveling around Banff and Lake Louise taking in the sights, sounds and smells of the Rocky Mountains. For only the second time in my life, I was experiencing snow falling and couldn’t wipe the smile off my face.

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Peyto Lake. –  Can you see the dogs head? I had a stunning snow day to view Peyto Lake, Lake Louise, Johnston Canyon and the Bow Valley Parkway!

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Before the tour and conference started, I added a few extra days of sightseeing through the Rocky Mountains. I enjoyed a snow day and here I am on my way down the hill from viewing Peyto Lake.

After a 4 hour drive from Banff to Edmonton, it was time to meet the team that would make up the pre-conference tour contingent. A group of around 50 people of varying ages and backgrounds, from various countries and having various connections to agriculture made up the group of keen agriculturalists. We were privileged to visit some fantastic enterprises throughout the  tour and meet some innovating and exciting people. On the first day visited a beef farm that calves down around 500 cows in the height of the Canadian winter and utilises a barn to assist with their winter nights that can reach -40*C.

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The pre-conference tour contingent at Lewis Farms

Following our property visit, we were able to tour the only plant in Canada that produces beef patties for McDonald’s burgers. Over 3 million patties are made on site every day and they all contain 100% Canadian beef. Following this stop, we had lunch at McDonald’s to sample the burgers made from the patty’s we had just seen. A quick trip to Jasper for some tourist activities, including a swim in the hot springs, a private tour of on the Jasper Sky Tram, an evening with the Jasper Planetarium and lunch at the Fairmont Hotel with lake and mountain views.

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Some of the pre-conference tour contingent enjoying the snow at the top of the Jasper Skytram. For a few of the Aussies, it was the first time seeing snow. Although we couldn’t see the spectacular views, we made up for it with snow angels, snow ball fights and trying to slide down the hill!! Our snow day in Jasper was an awesome bonding experience for the group and helped to create some special friendships which not only lasted the length of the conference but for many years to come.

The second tour day included a trip to visit a $50 million, farmer owned, fruit and vegetable wholesaler who source produce from across North and Central America. The farmers who own the business receive market price for their produce sold through the business during the year, then a percentage of profit at the end of the year. Following this, we attended the Rock Ridge Dairy, where 900 goats are milked every day in a specialised milking barn. Along with the home grown milk, the family buys in local milk to produce a range of goats and cow’s milk and soft cheeses.

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Dueces Greenhouses. Here we have a new section of cucumbers that have been in the system a few small weeks.

The afternoon was spent at Deuces Greenhouses where 11ac of Greenhouses allow the family owned business to produce summer vegetables in the height of the Canadian winter, and therefore attract high premiums during periods of low supply and high demand. Our last day of the pre-tour featured the Canadian grains industry, with a trip to Galloway Seeds, a family owned seed cleaning business. Cleaning around 18t of grain per hour, and removing over 99% of impurities, the company has mastered the 4 step cleaning process.

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John Deere, the international symbol for anything green! This big rig was parked up at Galloway Seeds.  

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One bank of the silos used at Galloway Seeds for storing grain before cleaning.

After lunch we visited the Rig Hand Distillery, a small company who are specialising in local grown alcohol. They source most of their inputs from within 20 miles of the distillery, and utilise local season produce such as potatoes, garlic, raspberries, wheat and beeswax. Each night after the tour, we would find ourselves at different functions and mingling with the delegates from across the globe. These connections will last us a lifetime and have not only provided holiday destinations around the world, but also provided links between people who wish to make global agriculture better!

The conference started with some sessions dedicated to the Next Generation contingent. We had presentations from a range of experts and agriculturalists around the world that opened up our way of thinking and strengthened our passion from sustainable agricultural production. We were challenged and motivated, encouraged and grew as professionals. One of the most interesting presentations for me was from Professor David Hughes, or as he is better known Dr. Food. A thought-provoking presentation from Dr. Food has had me thinking about the future of agriculture for the last 4 weeks, and I have added some thoughts below.

  • An increase in population of over 2 billion people by 2050, where 1.6 billion will be of Muslim or Hindu faith. What will these consumers prefer? What will be their protein of choice? What does this mean for our current, and future, farmers?
  • Africa will double population by 2050 (1 billion to 2 billion), and India, Bangladesh and Pakistan will increase by 0.5b each. Most Eastern European countries will decrease, so what impacts will this have on dynamics in-country? Who will care for their ageing?
  • Population growth is expected to be concentrated to cities. The 10th most populated city in China has the same GDP as the whole of Norway, or double that of NZ!
  • By 2050, China will be importing 6 million tonnes of animal products and 30% of global soy production. What does this mean for the rest of the world’s consumers? What impact will this have on protein demand worldwide?
  • Asian families typically sit down to a 12 course meal whereas westernised families sit down to meat and 3 veg. What does this mean for exporter’s worldwide? Do we need to put more emphasis on how our end consumer cooks and eats? What do they value? Just because chicken breast is the preferred cut in Australia doesn’t mean it is in any Asia country.
  • Protein sources. As producers and scientists, we see fish and red meat as two separate items. However consumers see them as competing protein sources. Should we be considering fish as a competing source when we market it as producers?
  • The future of food and protein. Are we moving to an era that sees red meat and fish take a step back to insects, meatless meat or maggots? Or will we see an increase in these products being used as a protein source for the animals that we use as a protein source?

The main conference joined the Next Generation delegates with the more senior delegates from across the globe. We heard from Princess Anne, and participated in sessions including:

  • Bees, Berries, Bars and Beer – young entrepreneurs who are forging their way in the agricultural industry in Canada
  • Management Show Topic – Managing the complexity of agricultural events on a large scale.
  • Bud Mercer – the future of special events. A perspective gained through the planning for the 2010 Winter Olympics.
  • Jeffery Fitzpatrick-Stilwell – Sustainability in beef and what it means for McDonald’s from a sourcing and processing perspective.
  • Social License Agriculture – Advocacy for agriculture. Should we protect people from the unpleasant or show the whole agricultural industry as it stands?
  • Agritainment panel – From the Calgary Stampede in Canada to the Kranji Countryside Association in Singapore, we learned how different dynamics lead to different methods of keeping crowds engaged and entertained
  • Peterson Farm Brothers – How using parodies of well-known songs can create opportunities to educate the world on agriculture and farming

The opportunity to attend the RASC Agricultural Conference in Edmonton, Canada, has reinvigorated my passion for agriculture and agricultural events. It has provided me with networks across the globe, containing people from all backgrounds and all ages. The conference introduced me to a range of experts and entrepreneurs who are forging their own path in global agriculture, and they have encouraged me that I have the ability to achieve my aims in agriculture. I have established connections in Australia, and look forward to working with more young people across our country, for example strengthening the connection of the youth committees of the RAS of NSW and RASV.

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A group of Next Generation Delegates – including agriculturalists from Australia, England, Wales and New Zealand! “

If anyone would like to know any more on the RASC Agricultural Conference or my experiences in Canada, I am more than happy to have a chat.

Tallong Public School win Grand Champion Kreative Koala 2018

Tallong Public School was declared Grand Champion Koala for their creative efforts investigating UN Sustainable Development Goal Life on the Land to bring attention to the endangered Tallong Midge Orchid, as part of the 2018 Kreative Koalas – Design a Bright Future Challenge, in an awards ceremony held at St Saviour’s Hall in Goulburn on Tuesday November 27.

Alongside their giant koala Tallong Public School ran a community concert. “Students either danced in a class dance and/or acted in a play called “Snugglepot and Cuddlepie in Tallong” where the gumnut babies find the rare and endangered Tallong Midge Orchid and together with their bush animal friends and students from TPS, find and protect the little orchid,” the school said. “The concert was well attended and received very positive feedback. The play directly connected to the message given by the Koala artwork; that of a need to protect the local endangered species of plants and animals.”

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Tallong Public School Principal Ellie Moore with students and Mary Bonet (LachLandcare) Giselle Newbury ( Southern Tablelands Arts) and Patricia Garcia AO National Program Manager  UN Sustainable Development Goals

The students from 4D at Young Public School were awarded runners-up with their evocative artwork named Chewy the Choking Koala. The students studied the SDG of Life Below the Water. “Through our research, we have been shocked and saddened by the amount of rubbish going into our waterways and eventually into the ocean,” the school said. “4D have identified plastic as the most damaging element of our rubbish.”

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 Students from Young Public School with sponsors Declan Close from Holcim Australia, Tanya Roberts from Australian Wind Alliance and Craig Simon from Acciona Energy with Kranky Koala

 Kreative Koalas is a unique example of 21st Century learning linking sustainability and art, pairing school students with Community Champions to create a call to action to help Australia meet its commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. In 2018 seven primary schools across the southern highlands participated.

Kreative Koalas asks students to communicate their learnings in art form on a giant fibreglass koala and to design an environmental community Call to Action project. More information on the program can be found on the website at www.kreativekoalas.com.au

Winners of the Best Digital Learning Journal section was Braidwood Central School.

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The team from Braidwood Central School

The Award for Kreative Koalas Youth Ambassador was presented to Goulburn West Public School student Mae O’Flynn by Mayor Bob Kirk

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Mayor Bob Kirk with Mae O’Flynn

Special guests at the Kreative Koalas awards ceremony were Australia’s National Program Manager for the UN Sustainable Development Goals Patricia Garcia AO and Mayor of the Goulburn Mulwaree Council Bob Kirk.

Kreative Koalas is proudly supported by Holcrim Australia,  Acciona Energy, Australian Wind Alliance, Lachlandcare, Southern Tablelands Art and NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. Special shoutout to MC Warren Brown for officiating on the day

All the photos from the Awards Day can be found here

HOW CAN YOUR REGION PARTICIPATE IN KREATIVE KOALAS 2019?

Kreative Koalas – Design a Bright Future Challenge puts students at the centre of the learning experience and empowers teachers to support their students to create the bright future we all deserve.

The Kreative Koalas funding model celebrates the research that shows that kids who go to schools that have strong relationships with business and the community have a much greater opportunity to thrive. Businesses and communities who engage with schools can enrich and enhance the delivery of education. Students can see their learnings have real-world significance. When schools, parents, business and communities partner together great things can happen in the lives of children and young adults.

If you would like to partner with your community to bring Kreative Koalas to your region, please contact Lynne Strong HeadKoala@kreativekoalas.com.au